OUR CLIENTS FIND

  • Their old study methods are no longer effective
  • They have no idea how to study in medical school or for boards
  • They experience issues with reading, retention, attention, or time management
  • They simply cannot manage the speed and volume of material
  • They struggle with boards-style multiple-choice exams

STATMed Learning addresses the following issues, which are commonly cited by incoming STATMed students:

INEFFECTIVE LEARNING STRATEGIES

Even the brightest students might have been compensating for cognitive weaknesses or skill set deficiencies that have not been exposed until now due to the rigors and demands of medical education.

PREVIOUS SUCCESS CAME FROM CRAMMING

While cramming can prove to be effective is many academic settings, it will likely crumble under sheer speed and volume of medical curricula and board exams.

PREVIOUS SUCCESS CAME FROM OVER-STUDYING

Since there is no extra time in medical training, this compensatory skill eventually runs out on many students with this profile.

PASSIVE LEARNER

Simply sitting in lecture, recopying notes, or re-reading handouts might have worked in other academic arenas (and might work for many medical students and doctors), but when students with this profile struggle, their approach needs to be entirely redesigned to engage active learning.

CANNOT MANAGE THE SPEED AND VOLUME OF MEDICAL SCHOOL

The popular analogy of “trying to drink from a fire hose” is an apt description for medical school learning. Learning how to organize and prioritize the “flow” of information is vital for mastering medical school and boards.

ATTENTION ISSUES

This can include problems with inattentiveness, impulsivity, and distractibility when studying or taking exams, or it can be a broader issue such as with a suspicion of ADHD or a diagnosis of ADHD.

READING ISSUES

Slow reading, passive reading, impaired reading, or other issues with speed, fluency, fluidity, and retention can obviously cause problems when dealing with the massive volume of information that needs to be processed in the classroom, when preparing for boards, or when actually taking timed exams.

LEARNING ISSUES

Problems with learning, attention, reading, executive functioning, processing speed, and other learning issues can certainly impair success in the classroom or on boards and need to be supported with elaborate learning methods.

ISSUES RE-STUDYING FOR BOARDS

Re-studying due to failure or recertification often creates its own set of problems, including but not limited to: issues with familiarity, not knowing what one knows versus what one does not know, passive study habits, failure to build either frameworks or retrieval pathways, among other things, since at this point, it all looks familiar. Therefore, studying devolves into reaffirming general awareness and does little to precisely target the critical details needed for boards success.

RELIED ON TESTING ACCOMODATIONS IN THE PAST

While STATMed has no problem with accommodations and recommends taking them when available, STATMed plans on no one getting accommodations since they are historically difficult to get for the USMLE, and 95% of STATMed successes come from students who did not use accommodations on their boards.

HISTORY OF POOR STANDARDIZED TEST PERFORMANCE

Bad test-taking is real and usually falls within a certain pattern at this level, especially once students are into boards-level exams. These issues likely include: a history of inconsistent performance on standardized exams, not benefiting from traditional advice, problems accurately interpreting the test questions, discrepancy between knowledge base and scores, and inconsistent performance.